Bring Terramation To Your State

Do you want equal access to gentle, sustainable deathcare? Join the #idratherbecompost movement and learn what you can do to bring terramation to your state!

Making our last act one that gives back

The #IdRatherBeCompost movement was created to lead the charge in making Terramation (Also known as Natural Organic Reduction, or human composting) available across the country. Currently, only a few U.S. states allow the Natural Organic Reduction process to take place, we won’t stop until the process is legalized in every U.S state. Get your legislative letter template to send to your state using the form below!

Washington
Legal
Oregon
Legal
Colorado
Legal
Vermont
Legal
California
Legal
Delaware
Blocked
Hawaii
Blocked
Illinois
Legislation Introduced
Massachusetts
Legislation Introduced
Minnesota
Blocked
New York
Legislation Introduced - Waiting For Governor
Maine
Blocked
0
Legalized States
0
Legislation Introduced
0
No Action States
  • Legal
  • Passed
  • Legislation Introduced
  • Not Yet Introduced
  • Blocked

Making our last act one that gives back

We’ve heard the call for more access to sustainable deathcare options and have created a space to help you learn and gather the needed information to make Terramation a reality in your area! We believe that everyone should have equal access to deathcare options that align with their beliefs and preferences.

Currently, Terramation or “human composting” is legal in Washington, Colorado, and Oregon with several more states actively passing legislation. In order to gather momentum in more states and push bills for human composting through the legislature and senate, we need your help. It’s not necessarily that human composting is illegal, there is just no language for this method of disposition written into current funeral laws in each state. So it is not legal, but that doesn’t mean it’s outlawed!  In order for your state to consider legislation, they need to know that there is a desire for access to options by the people in that state… YOU!

Encouraging states to give equal access to sustainable deathcare options begins by understanding why Terramation or human composting is a preferred option. Let’s look at cremation: cremation uses roughly the equivalent of 30 gallons of fuel per person, and when you calculate this for all of the cremations that we compete in the US every year that is enough fuel for 1307 round trips to the moon. Each individual cremation also emits about 530lbs of CO2 into the atmosphere. The end product of cremation is inert charred bone that is often detrimental to the plant life it is sometimes placed upon.

Traditional burial has downfalls of its own. Almost all cemeteries require the use of a casket and outer burial container to uphold the earth around the casket. This means that a person is usually embalmed for preservation, placed in a casket, that is then placed inside a concrete and rebar lined box so that the person never touches the earth and never has the chance to return to it. Instead, the person is sealed into the ground, creating perpetual land use, and removing the ability for organic matter to return to the earth. Each year, approximately 20 million board feet of hardwood (including rainforest woods), 1.6 million tons of concrete, 17,000 tons of copper and bronze, and 64,500 tons of steel are used to create caskets and outer burial containers. That list of resources is truly shocking, and this is barely the tip of the iceberg. 

Now that we know our traditional methods of disposition are not great for the planet we call home. So then why is Terramation or human composting the answer?

Terramation uses approximately 1/8th the energy of a standard 2 hour cremation over a 60 day period. Let that sink in. With that, each Terramation sequesters into soil the carbon that would be sent up the smoke stack of a crematory. We all grieve differently, that we understand, and as a society we do not give ourselves and others the grace to grieve slowly. Grief is not meant to be fast-paced! Oftentimes, after a person dies, it is only a few days before you are handed back an urn of ashes. Terramation or human composting takes approximately 60 days, which allows you to slow down the process of physical separation from your loved one. You’re able to continue to visit and sit with them like at a cemetery, maybe even decorate their vessel during their stay at Return Home. We do not encourage forcing yourself to get back to “normal” in just a few days. 

We believe Terramation is the death care answer to benefitting our planet and the environment, and to the grieving hearts of healing loved ones.

Legislation Letter Request